Spring 2018 glas COURSES

 Course Instructor/Time/CRN Course Description
GLAS 100
Introduction to Global Asian Studies 
Instructor: Michael Jin
TR 9:30-10:45 am
CRN 39450

This course examines various historical, cultural, and political representations of Asia, Asian America, and Asians in the world. Students will explore how peoples and ideas from Asia and across transoceanic and transnational diasporas have influenced a globalized world and continue to inform our contemporary understanding of Asia and Asian America. The course also examines how historical issues such as colonialism, war, global capitalism, and migration have shaped the experiences and representations of Asians, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and peoples in Asian diasporas. World Cultures course.
GLAS 105 Asian and/or Asian American Studies Seminar  Instructor: Karen Su 

T 3:30-4:20 pm
CRN 39126

W 1:00-1:50 pm
CRN 39127

R 12:30-1:20 pm
CRN 39125
Topic: Asian American and Pacific Islander College Student Experiences.
This seminar is part of the Asian American Mentor Program, a unique program designed to support new first-year or transfer students in their first semester at UIC.* The weekly seminar focuses on Asian American identities, cultures, and communities. We will critically examine historical events, the media, popular culture, and personal narratives to study how social, academic, personal, and community issues impact Asian Americans, while paying attention to distinctions between Asian American and Pacific Islander identities and issues. In addition, students will be introduced to college life and campus resources to ease the transition to UIC. 
*To apply for the Asian American Mentor Program, please visit http://go.uic.edu/aamp.
GLAS 120 Introduction to Asian American Studies
Instructor: Lorenzo Perillo

TR 11:00-12:15 pm
CRN 39129/39128

This course provides students with a survey of major concepts, methods, and debates in the study of Asian American studies. Students will also gain an introduction to the histories, community institutions, and contemporary issues of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Individual and Society, and US Society course.
GLAS 123  
Introduction to Asian American Literature
Instructor: Mark Chiang

MWF 10:00-10:50 am
CRN38904/38905
Introductory survey of a wide range of Asian American literature in various socio-historical contexts. Same as ENGL 123. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Discussion. Creative Arts course, and US Society course.
GLAS 200 Gandhi: The History and Practice of Nonviolence
Instructor: Rama Mantena

MWF 11:00-11:50 am
CRN 40461
This class will explore the politics and strategy of nonviolent resistance as formulated by M.K. Gandhi in the context of British imperial rule and the appropriation and refining of the method by civil rights activists and leaders in the US from Howard Thurman to Martin Luther King Jr. We will consider how the theory and practice of nonviolence evolved and changed as it moved from one context to another. The main objective of this course is to become familiar with the basic tenets of Gandhi’s thought and the diverse legacies of his ideas. Much of the semester will be dedicated to closely reading Gandhi's writings and the writings and speeches of Martin Luther King Jr. Same as HIST 200. 
GLAS 209
Advanced Chinese Language and Culture
Instructor: Duosi Meng

MWF 11:00-11:50 am
CRN 39792
Chinese culture as reflected in language, communication, daily life, and creative works. Intensive listening, speaking, reading and writing at the intermediate-advanced level. Course Information: Same as  CHIN 209. Taught in a mix of English and Mandarin Chinese, with more use of Mandarin Chinese over the semester. All assignments are to be completed in Chinese. Grade of C or better in  CHIN 104; or placement test score or AP score equivalent to completion of CHIN 104; or instructor's approval.
GLAS 264
The Pacific Rim in Modern History
Instructor: Michael Jin

TR 11:00-12:15 pm
CRN491190
 

What do cultures and societies in Latin America, East Asia, Pacific Islands, and the United States have in common? More than you might think. This course examines the connected histories of peoples and societies in the modern Pacific Rim world since the nineteenth century to the present. We will explore cross-regional, transnational, and global aspects of how human migrations, colonialism, and the circulation of ideas, cultures, and commodities have intimately connected the experiences of peoples across Asia-Pacific, the United States, and Latin America. Students in this class will explore how imperialism, war, transoceanic trade, diplomacy, and globalization have impacted the experiences of various groups of people, such as indigenous peoples, migrants and sojourners across national and colonial borders, and peoples in diasporas. Critical examination of the connected histories of various societies in the modern Pacific Rim world, including the American West, Asia, and Latin America, since the nineteenth century. Course Information: Same as HIST 264. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161. 

GLAS 272
China Since 1911
Instructor: Laura Hostetler

TR 9:30-10:45 am
CRN 39459/39460
Twentieth-century China from 1911 to the present, including warfare; areas of intellectual inquiry; changes in government, family, and the role of women. Same as HIST 272.
GLAS 290
Special Topics in Asian American Studies

Instructor: Lorenzo Perillo

TR 2:30-3:15pm
CRN 39133 
Topic: Hip Hop Dance and Asian American Cultural Politics 
GLAS 290 Special Topics in Asian American Studies
Instructor: Nina Shoman-Dajanii

W 3:00-5:45 pm
CRN 39134
Topic: Introduction to Arab American Studies    
GLAS 300  
Global Asia in Chicago
Instructor: Anna Guevarra

M 3:00 - 5:45 pm
CRN 39136

How do labor, capital, commodities, culture, and racialized/gendered bodies intersect to produce “Global Asia?” How do translocalities such as Chicago operate through multiple transnational connections, suturing migrant bodies, commodities, labor, and capital in complex, and sometimes unexpected ways? To whom do these Asian ethnic enclaves belong in the global city of Chicago? In this interdisciplinary course, students will contribute to the creation of a three-dimensional digital story map that virtually and ethnographically documents a narrative of space, history, and everyday labor. Instructor approval required. 

GLAS 494
Advanced Topics in Asian Studies
Instructor: Gayatri Reddy

M 3:00 - 5:50 pm
CRN 39968/39969
Topic: Gender and the South Asian Diaspora 























Fall 2017 GLAS Program Information
Spring 2018 GLAS Courses

global Asian Studies Course Descriptions

100 Introduction to Global Asian Studies
3 hours. World Cultures course.
105 Asian and/or Asian American Studies Seminar
1 hour. May be repeated to a maximum of 3 hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Previously listed as ASAM 105.
120 Intro Asian American Studies
3 hours. Same as SOC 120. Previously listed as ASAM 125. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion and one Lecture. Individual and Society course, and US Society course.
125 Introduction to the Art and Architecture of Asia
3 hours. Same as AH 125. Field trip required at a nominal fee. Creative Arts course, and World Cultures course.
210
Asian American Histories
3 hours. Previously listed as ASAM 210. Individual and Society course, and US Society course.
 224  Archaeology of Mainland Southeast Asia
3 hours. Same as ANTH 224. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101 or ANTH 102; or consent of the instructor. 
230
Cultural Politics of Asian American Food
3 hours. Previously listed as ASAM 230. Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above. Recommended background: GLAS 120. Individual and Society course, and US Society course.
231   Introduction to Chinese Politics
3 hours. Same as POLS 231. Prerequisite(s): POLS 130; or consent of the instructor. World Cultures course.
250 Critical Issues in Community Engagement
 
3 hours.  Previously listed as ASAM 275. Prerequisite(s): GLAS 120. Individual and Society course, and US Society course
271
Late Imperial China
3 hours. Same as HIST 271. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161; or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion and one Lecture. Past course, and World Cultures course.
275 History of South Asia to 1857
3 hours.  Same as HIST 275. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161; or consent of the instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Discussion. Past course, and World Cultures course.
279  South Asian Cultures and Societies
3 hours. Same as ANTH 279. Individual and Society course, and World Cultures course.
328
Asian American Literature
3 hours.  Same as ENGL 328. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in ENGL 240; and Grade of C or better in ENGL 243. Recommended background: ENGL 123.
437  The Indian Ocean World: Contact, Commerce, Culture
3 hours. Same as ANTH 436 and HIST 437.
471
Topics in Asian Art and Architecture
3 hours. Same as AH 471. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Prerequisite(s): 3 hours of Asian art and/or architecture or consent of the instructor.
495
Independent Study (1-4 hours)

May be repeated. Previously listed as ASAM 495. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.