Photo of Liechty, Mark

Mark Liechty, PhD

Associate Professor

History and Anthropology

Contact

Building & Room:

3110-D BSB

Address:

1007 W Harrison Street

Office Phone Voice:

(312) 413-3581

About

Mark Liechty is a cultural anthropologist with a joint appointment in History and Anthropology.  He is a South Asianist whose research focuses on Nepali history and society.  His research and teaching interests include class theory and social organization, mass media, consumer culture, cultural history, social and cultural theory, tourism, youth culture, globalization, and South Asian history. Liechty is currently working on a cultural history of tourism in Nepal from 1950 to 1980.

Selected Publications

(2017) Far Out: Countercultural Seekers and the Tourist Encounter in Nepal. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

(2012) The Global Middle Classes: Theorizing Through Ethnography. Santa Fe: SAR Press. Edited, with Rachel Heiman and Carla Freeman.

(2010) Out Here in Kathmandu: Modernity on the Global Periphery. Kathmandu: Martin Chautari Press.

(2010) The Key to an Oriental World: Boris Lissanevitch, Kathmandu’s Royal Hotel, and the “Golden Age” of Tourism in Nepal. Studies in Nepali History and Society. 15(2):253-95.

(2007) Building the Road to Kathmandu: Notes on the History of Tourism in Nepal. Himalaya 25 [2005] (1-2): 19-28.

(2005) Carnal Economies: The Commodification of Food and Sex in Kathmandu. Cultural Anthropology 20(1):1-38.

(2003) Suitably Modern: Making Middle-Class Culture in a New Consumer Society. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

(1997) Selective Exclusion: Foreigners, Foreign Goods, and Foreignness in Modern Nepali History. Studies in Nepali History and Society 2(1):5-68.

(1996) Taking Liberties: Women’s Freedom and Sexual Harassment in Kathmandu. Labour, Capital and Society 29(1-2):56-84.

(1996) Kathmandu as Translocality: Multiple Places in a Nepali Space. In Geography of Identity. Patricia Yaeger, ed. Pp. 98-130. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Education

PhD Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, 1994