Photo of Paik, A. Naomi

A. Naomi Paik

Associate Professor

Global Asian Studies and Criminology, Law and Justice

Contact

Building & Room:

1026 UH

Address:

601 S. Morgan

Office Phone:

(312) 996-5091

About

A. Naomi Paik is the author of Bans, Walls, Raids, Sanctuary: Understanding U.S. Immigration for the 21st Century (2020, University of California Press) and Rightlessness: Testimony and Redress in U.S. Prison Camps since World War II (UNC Press; winner, Best Book in History, AAAS 2018; runner-up, John Hope Franklin prize for best book in American Studies, ASA, 2017), as well as articles, opinion pieces, and interviews in a range of academic and public-facing venues. She is co-chair of the Radical History Review editorial collective and has co-edited three special issues of the journal—“Militarism and Capitalism (Winter 2019), “Radical Histories of Sanctuary” (Fall 2019), and “Policing, Justice, and the Radical Imagination” (Spring 2020)—and will coedit “Against the Anthropocene” with Ashley Dawson (Winter 2023). Collaborating with Gerry Cadava and Cat Ramirez, she coedits the “Borderlands” section of Public Books. She is an associate professor of Criminology, Law, and Justice and Global Asian Studies at the University of Illinois, Chicago, and a member of the Migration Scholars Collaborative and the Cops Off Campus Coalition.

Education

Doctor of Philosophy, American Studies, Yale University, 2009
Dissertation: “Testifying to Rightlessness: Redressing the Camp in Narratives of U.S. Culture and Law”

Graduate Certificate in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Yale University, 2008

Master of Philosophy, American Studies, Yale University, 2007
Exam Fields:
Theories of Empire and Imperialism (Michael Denning)
Feminism without Borders (Hazel V. Carby)
Asian American History and Literary & Cultural Studies (Sanda Mayzaw Lwin)
Rethinking the 20th Century U.S. Literary Canon (Wai Chee Dimock)

Master of Arts, American Studies, Yale University, 2005

Bachelor of Arts, cum laude, Women’s & Gender Studies and Asian American Studies, Columbia University, 2001